header image
All our content
Hot Chocolate
Top Blog Articles
News Feeds
Advanced Search
Contact Us

Follow Us
Follow us on Twitter
Commercial Coffee Machines
Coffee Suppliers
Freshly Roasted Espresso Coffee
Home arrow All our content arrow Coffee Articles arrow Twinings Speciality Teas
Twinings Speciality Teas PDF Print E-mail
Written by c0ff33   
Apr 16, 2013 at 09:44 AM

Core Range Main

Coffee has dominated menus for over a decade, despite us Brits being a nation of tea drinkers. Tea has long suffered from a lack of operator love and attention, with limited understanding of which teas are suitable for each serving occasion.

By understanding what your customers want from their tea range and when and where to serve, we will ensure that Tea takes its place at the top of the menu once again!

Core Main One

Understanding your customer base and their need states from tea will help increase your sales and improve customer loyalty to your outlet. 

Getting the core range and format right will:

  • Drive sales and profits from your tea range
  • Encourage repeat custom from consumers
  • Improve consumer delight with the right range served in the right serving occasion

But what to serve and where? Earl Grey or Lapsang? Teabags or loose tea? With 300 years experience, Twinings can advise you on your optimum tea menu.

Everyday Tea....

With mainstream teas dominating tea consumption (80% of tea consumed is mainstream) it is essential to offer an Everyday brew to cater for the traditionalists amongst your customers. Everyday tea is a great choice for those seeking a strong, traditional tasting tea. If your clientele  are seeking something a little more refined, why not offer English Breakfast or Traditional Afternoon as your 'mainstream' tea, as these are both traditional tasting teas which would meet the need for a strong cuppa.

Core Range One

Speciality teas...

25% of households regularly consume speciality teas, as consumers trade up to blended and flavoured teas which offer something a little extra over their mainstream tea.

Earl Grey is Twinings signature blend, as we blended the original china black tea with bergamot for the first Earl Grey. The nation fell in love with this lightly scented tea, and as such 13% of all households now consume Earl Grey regularly.  As consumers seek to trade up when out of home and treat themselves to a superior cup, Earl Grey should be a staple on your tea menu.

Alternative flavoured or scented teas include Lapsang Souchong (*Not for the faint hearted - a powerful smoky scent and flavour) or for a single estate blend, Assam (strong, malty taste - good for traditionalist tea drinkers) or Darjeeling and Ceylon (light delicate teas, go easy on the milk).

Core Range Two

Green Teas...

Green Tea is the fastest growing tea category, growing at +7% year on year as consumers seek healthier options.  14% of households now buy a Green Tea regularly, so it is essential to offer at least 1 Green tea on your tea menu. Pure Green Tea is the best selling Green, but is often off-putting to those who have never tried Green Tea before due to its strong flavour. Why not offer a flavoured Green Tea, such as Green Tea and Lemon and Green and Cranberry if your customers are new to Green Tea, and offer Pure Green Tea as the staple on your menu?

Fruit and Herbal Infusions....

Health has been a key driver in the growth of Infusions. Caffeine free and full of juicy fruits or tasty herbs, Infusions are a popular alternative to coffee and tea on menus. 20% of households regularly drink Infusions and therefore at least 2 Infusions should be offered on your menus.

Core Range Three

Decaff options....

Decaffeinated products are certainly growing in popularity, as consumers become more health conscious and seek the same great taste but without the caffeine.

Other than the caffeine free Infusions range, Twinings can also offer 2 decaff options for your caffeine free purists, English Breakfast Decaff and Redbush.

Core Range Four


As a rule of thumb, for any areas where consumers are helping themselves to tea, caterers should provide enveloped teabags for freshness and hygiene.

For quick serve cafes and restaurants, or any outlets which prepare tea back of house, string & tag teabags should be used for speed of service and brand visibility.

Although loose tea is experiencing a renaissance, it is generally reserved for waiter service at table due to the complexities of service. Of course, loose tea can be served anywhere where the outlet feels a premium service is appropriate and if they have the appropriate teapots and strainers to create a loose tea service.

•   http://789bookmarks.com/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-tea-bags?939548525...

•   http://a-jyo.com/story.php?id=92406...

•   http://allbusinessfinance.org/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-tea-bags?528146855...

•   http://bookmarkingmeerkat.com/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-string-and-tag?359757725...

•   http://bookmarkspice.info/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-string-and-tag-tea-bags?258229828...

•   http://diplomadosanuv.org/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-tea-bags?349328248...

•   http://dozeru.com/tags.php/253921...

•   http://excellentscrapbooking.com/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-string-and-tag?749539448...

•   http://fruytio.com/story.php?id=231654...

•   http://ihotinot.com/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-string-and-tag-tea-bags?756119745...

•   http://issueadvocacypartners.com/story.php?title=twinings-everyday-tea-bags?415517236...

•   http://iwanttotalkaboutyou.com/tags.php/4205...

Last Updated ( Jul 04, 2013 at 11:57 AM )

Kenco Westminster medium roast filter coffee is a carefully selected blend of coffee beans from Central and Southern America. The Kenco Westminster coffee beans are slowly toasted until they reach a medium roast, and then they are ground to filter coffee grade. Kenco Westminster coffee is a smooth, fruity, slightly sweet and well rounded filter coffee.

Kenco Westminster coffee is a smooth and fruity coffee in 60g sachets for optimum freshness.Kenco Westminster coffee is named after the City of Westminster in London.

Why use Kenco?

Kenco's coffee comes from Rainforest Alliance Certified™ farms, where forests are protected and rivers, soils and wildlife conserved. Kenco choose the best beans and the best eco-friendly packaging, it's the thought - that makes the difference - that counts.

Great coffee is made with great care. It's the care Kenco takes - at every stage of production - that makes the coffee you love.

Kenco makes coffee while the sun shines. During the dry season Kenco hand picks their coffee 'cherries' when they're at their ripest!

How do you guarantee the best quality?

Kenco dries the superiour beans from the coffee cherries under the tropical afternoon sun, and they do it evenly so they're perfectly dried all 'round. That means turning them every half hour or so.
Only the best quality beans are selected for roasting - at just the right temperature to create just the right flavour.


Your cup of Kenco coffee tastes even better when you know that it's grown using sustainable farming methods.

Kenco's friendship with the Rainforest Alliance ensures a better living for the people and their families who grow your coffee. It also helps protect the environment and the wildlife that depend on it. Proof, as if it were needed, that good taste and good work can go together!

Kenco buys all the beans for their freeze dried range from Rainforest Alliance CertifiedTM farms. That's 100% commitment to providing the coffee growing community with better wages, education, healthcare and environment protection - a better move forward all around.

Our History...

The early days - 1920s - 1945
In the 1920s a group of retired coffee planters set up a highly fashionable chain of coffee shops under the banner of The Kenya Coffee Company.
In 1921, LC Gibbs and CS Baines began selling coffee from a shop in Vere Street, Mayfair. The shop sold roast and ground coffee locally but most of its sales were by mail order - selling coffee to country houses using advertisements in publications like Tatler, Country Life and The Times.
As demand increased, the company moved to number 30 Sloane Street, an equally fashionable address and bought premises in Long Lane, Bermondsey.
Subsequently, premises at London's Earlsfield were acquired to cope with increased roasting and packing.
The Bermondsey premises were next door to a food merchants called John Gardiner (later Gardiner Merchant). Gardiner ran a food wholesaling business, restaurants - including the uber-chic Scott's seafood restaurant - and provided outdoor catering at events such as Wimbledon. They purchased their coffee from The Kenya Coffee Company.

After the war
After the Second World War, a Gardiner employee, Tom Kelly, persuaded the company to buy The Kenya Coffee Company. On completion of the deal, Tom Kelly was put in charge of the new business and he expanded the retail chain.
As well as selling coffee by mail order and from the Sloane Street premises, Kelly diversified into catering and opened coffee shops in the King's Road in Chelsea, Kingston, Wimbledon, Golders Green, Old Compton Street, Knightsbridge, Ealing and outside London in Cambridge, Glasgow, Leicester and Norwich.
The Kenya Coffee Company shops may well have been the first branded high street coffee shop chain in the UK!

Expansion in the swinging sixties
By the 1960s, The Kenya Coffee Company cafes were thriving - selling not only coffee but also cakes. The cakes were made in London and then shipped by road and rail to the various branches each night.
Tom Kelly also spotted the wider opportunity for espresso coffee - after acquiring the rights to sell Gaggia machines, the company began to supply these to other coffee bars.
During the 60s, the amount of beans that The Kenya Coffee Company bought from Kenya began to decrease substantially and the company name was changed to The Kenco Coffee Company to reflect this. In 1962, Kenco branded coffee was first served! The success of the company was noticed by larger corporations and it was taken over by the hotel group, Truste House, while roasting continued at the Earlsfield site.
Kenco coffee continued to be served through all the coffee shops and whole beans and ground coffees were sold in 2oz jars alongside jam and other speciality goods. To meet increasing demand Kenco set up a national sales force to sell Kenco coffee to other coffee shop businesses.

The seventies
In 1972, Truste House (now Truste House Forte) sold the Kenco brand to Cadbury.
Under Cadbury ownership,The Kenco Coffee Company sales team was supported by a nimble fleet of delivery vans and continued to grow significantly - so much so that in the mid 1970s the desirable Kenco brand was acquired by Premier Foods.
The eighties and nineties
In 1987 General Foods purchased The Kenco Coffee Company and it was in these decades that the foundations of today's Kenco Coffee Company were laid - although as you can see, the brand looks a little bit different today!

The future
The Kenco Coffee Company history is rich and varied. We like to think that we've always been a company that has anticipated trends and adapted accordingly sometimes with radical results. As British consumers become increasingly sophisticated about their coffee choices when they're away from home, we continue to strive for innovation and to anticipate consumer requirements - whether that's a dark roasted Italian espresso or an ethically sourced coffee.

Flowers Love Coffee Too

Your old filter papers and old coffee can be composted. Old coffee grounds can be used in your garden, and here are a few useful facts on how to go about using old coffee grounds for plants and flowers.
Coffee grounds lose most of their acidity during the coffee brewing process, leaving the coffee grounds with an average pH of 6.9 and a carbon-nitrogen ratio of 20-1.

Primary Nutrients:

Nitrogen 1.45%, Phosphorus ND ug/g, Potassium 1204 ug/g.

Secondary Nutrients:

Calcium 389 up/g, Magnesium 448 ug/g, Sulphur high ug/g.

Old coffee grounds can be mixed with general soil around acid loving plants, which include azaleas, hydrangeas, rhododendrons and camellias. You can add brown leaves and grass cuttings to the coffee grounds, to make mulch which will help to balance the pH of your soil. By mixing your old coffee grounds into the compost you will help to accelerate the composting process.

Please note there are two main types of ingredients to add to your compost.

1. Brown materials such as old coffee filter papers, tea bags, dead leaves, old papers and wood sawdust, these are all high in carbon.
2. Green materials such as old coffee grounds, tea, food waste and even manure, these are all high in nitrogen.

A simple rule is, to mix half and half of the above brown and green materials to make the perfect compost! You can even help a worm bin to flourish by feeding the worms with old coffee grounds mixed with some brown material.

As a small word of caution, please remember when using old coffee grounds for composting, you should never use more than 25% of coffee grounds in any one compost pile!


Espresso Coffee Revealed

Espresso coffee was actually invented in France, before being perfected in Italy, and is today enjoyed around the world, making espresso coffee a truly universal beverage.
Espresso coffee is a particular style of coffee drink and not a specific type of coffee bean.
Espresso coffee is made from very finely ground coffee beans, which is tightly packed, and through which hot water is forced at pressure, to extract maximum flavour. The result is a rich, dark and extremely flavourful concentrated black coffee. On average, a single espresso coffee is usually a 7g dose of finely ground coffee, which should take 20 seconds to make a 30ml shot of espresso. The perfect espresso should then result in a fabulous shot of dark coffee which is topped off by a beautiful, 3-4 mm head of thick golden foam known as "Crema ", which is a product of the coffee's natural oils and the source of its rich flavour and aroma. The ideal espresso should be served in cups that are dry and warm, possibly narrow in order to concentrate the espresso's aromas and crema.

The Coffee Grind is Critical.

The ideal grind will result in a slow, steady flow of espresso coffee. As with most coffee, the best time to grind your coffee beans is immediately before brewing. If the grind is too coarse, the coffee will gush out and the espresso will be weak and under extracted. Too fine a grind and the espresso will drip out, one bitter drip at a time. The correct dose nearly fills your filter insert / basket with the freshly ground fine coffee, with a consistency between flour and sugar, and leaving a small gap for the grounds of coffee to expand as they become saturated.
For lower pressure units, an extra fine grind with some granularity will work, you can even use an inexpensive coffee bean grinder to achieve this texture. High pressure commercial coffee machines require a finer, more powdery grind , which can be obtained from a commercial grinder .

The Portion of Ground Coffee Required.

A single shot of espresso coffee requires roughly 1-1.5 table spoons or 7 grams of ground coffee. Be aware to not overfill your filter insert, always leaving a small gap to let the coffee expand.


Tamping is the gentle packing down of the finely ground coffee into the coffee filter prior to brewing. This ensures that the water will flow evenly through the coffee grounds, producing a complete extraction of all the coffee flavour.

The Extraction.

A shot of espresso should ideally take 20 seconds for a 30ml of liquid coffee, and should flow as freely as honey from a spoon. Should your extraction times be any shorter or longer, you may wish to check your coffee grind .A double shot of ground coffee should result in a double espresso of 60 ml. The pump pressure of the traditional cappuccino espresso machine should be at 9 atmospheres, and the water temperature between 84 and 93 C.

The Truth and Misconceptions about Espresso.

The first misconception about espresso coffee is that it should be bitter and burnt tasting. Actually, a perfect espresso shot should be aromatic, bitter sweet and assertive, with a lingering aftertaste.
The second myth is that drinking an espresso will keep you awake all night. However, despite an espresso having a strong flavour, it actually contains less caffeine than a regular coffee. Typically 60-80 mg of caffeine per shot of espresso as compared to 80-100mg per cup of regular coffee due to espresso's shorter extraction time.
Finally, most people think it takes a lot of time and effort to prepare a shot of espresso, but as the name implies, it is easy and very quick to make a perfect espresso coffee