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Home arrow All our content arrow Coffee Articles arrow What are the health benefits of coffee?
What are the health benefits of coffee? PDF Print E-mail
Written by c0ff33   
Jul 01, 2015 at 09:30 AM

A cup of coffee in the morning may pack more than just an energy boost.

More and more research is emerging to suggest that there may be several health benefits associated with drinking this dark black beverage, from helping prevent diabetes to lowering the risk of liver disease.

The consumption of coffee goes back centuries.

In 17th century England the popularity of the drink gave rise to a number of coffee houses which were dubbed 'penny universities', because with one penny a person could buy a cup of coffee and have intellectually stimulating conversations with other people.1

Nowadays, with over 400 billion cups consumed every year, coffee is one of the world's most popular drinks. But what makes it special?

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods.

Nutritional breakdown of coffee
Calorie count

Regular black coffee (without milk or cream) has a very low calorie count. A typical cup of black coffee only contains around 2 calories.

However, if you add sugar and milk, the calorie count can shoot up.

A splash of coffee
Antioxidants

Coffee is the number one source of antioxidants in the U.S., according to researchers at the University of Scranton.

Joe Vinson, Ph.D., lead author of the study, said that "Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than any other dietary source. Nothing else comes close."2

The authors of the study emphasize moderation, stating that only one or two cups a day appear to be beneficial.

Caffeinated and decaffeinated versions provided nearly the same levels of antioxidants.

Health benefits of coffee
The potential health benefits associated with drinking coffee include: protecting against type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, liver disease, liver cancer, and promoting a healthy heart.3

Coffee may protect against type 2 diabetes

Coffee may be protective against type 2 diabetes. Researchers at UCLA identified that drinking coffee increases plasma levels of the protein sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG controls the biological activity of the body's sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) which play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.4

Dr. Simin Liu, one of the authors of the study, said that an "inverse association" exists between coffee consumption and risk for type 2 diabetes.

Increased coffee consumption may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes - the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers gathered data from three studies. In these studies, the diets of the participants were evaluated using questionnaires every 4 years, with participants who reported having type 2 diabetes filling out additional questionnaires. In total, 7,269 study participants had type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that the participants who increased their coffee intake by more than one cup a day (on average, an increase of 1.69 cups per day) over a 4-year period had an 11% lower type 2 diabetes risk over the subsequent 4 years, compared with people who did not change their intake.

Coffee may help prevent Parkinson's disease

Researchers in the U.S. carried out a study that assessed the link between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease risk. The authors of the study concluded that "higher coffee and caffeine intake is associated with a significantly lower incidence of Parkinson's disease".5

In addition, caffeine in coffee may help control movement in people suffering from Parkinson's, according to a study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) that was published in the journal Neurology.6

Coffee may lower the risk of liver cancer

Italian researchers found that coffee consumption lowers the risk of liver cancer by about 40%. In addition, some of the results suggest that if you drink three cups a day, the risks are reduced by more than 50%.7

The lead author of the study, Dr. Carlo La Vecchia, from Milan's Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, said "our research confirms past claims that coffee is good for your health and particularly the liver."

Coffee may help prevent liver disease

Regular consumption of coffee is linked to a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare autoimmune disease of the bile ducts in the liver.8

In addition, coffee consumption can lower the incidence of cirrhosis of the liver for alcohol drinkers by 22%, according to a study at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, California, USA.

The authors of the study concluded that the results "support the hypothesis that there is an ingredient in coffee that protects against cirrhosis, especially alcoholic cirrhosis."9

Research published in the journal Hepatology in April 2014, suggests that drinking coffee is linked to a decreased liver cirrhosis death risk. The researchers suggest that drinking two or more cups of coffee every day can reduce the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%.16

A study published in the journal Hepatology indicates that drinking decaf coffee also lowers liver enzyme levels, suggesting the benefits are not linked to caffeine content.

Coffee may be good for the heart

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard School of Public Health, concluded that drinking coffee in moderation protects against heart failure. They defined 'in moderation' as 2 European cups (equivalent to two 8-ounce American servings) per day.10

People who drank four European cups on a daily basis had an 11% lower risk of heart failure, compared to those who did not.

The authors stressed that their results "did show a possible benefit, but like with so many other things we consume, it really depends on how much coffee you drink."

Recent developments on the benefits of coffee from MNT news
Tinnitus less common in women who drink more coffee. A new study in The American Journal of Medicine finds that women who consume more caffeine are less likely to have tinnitus.
Study links coffee intake with reduced risk of endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common cancer of the female reproductive organs in the US, affecting around 1 in 37 women in their lifetime. But in a new study, researchers found that drinking three to four cups of coffee a day could reduce the risk of endometrial cancer by almost a fifth.
Drinking up to five cups of coffee a day may benefit the arteries. A new study has suggested drinking three to five cups of coffee a day reduces the risk of clogged arteries and heart attacks.
Coffee linked to reduced risk of erectile dysfunction. Drinking two to three cups of coffee every day could lower a man's risk of erectile dysfunction. This is according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE.
Risks
Drinking too much coffee can result in some very unpleasant adverse effects. According to a study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma, "caffeine can cause anxiety symptoms in normal individuals, especially in vulnerable patients, like those with pre-existing anxiety disorders."13

In addition, "caffeine use is also associated with symptoms of depression due to either a self-medication theory, or a theory that caffeine itself causes changes in mood."

Women who plan on becoming pregnant should be cautious. Researchers from the University of Nevada School of Medicine reported in the British Journal of Pharmacology that regular coffee may reduce a woman's chances of becoming pregnant.14
Medical News Today examined the positive and negative effects of drinking coffee in an article in July 2012, Drinking Coffee: More Good Than Harm?.

Read the full article here

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Espresso machines have become more and more popular over the last decade. The first commercial espresso machines were built by Achille Gaggia in 1938. They work on the principle of hot water being forced over coffee under pressure to produce espresso coffee.The size and complexity of machines vary and consideration must be given before choosing the right system.

 

Smaller espresso machines have a single group head and low capacity boilers. Some of these single group machines have hand fill water tanks however most commercial espresso systems need a mains water supply. Single group espresso machines have a single steam wand for steaming and foaming milk and can produce either one or two cups of espresso coffee at any one time.

 

Commercial espresso machines have one, two, three or four group heads, one or two steam wands, hot water facilities and a cup warming areas. Choices of semi or fully automatic group heads are usually available however automatic group heads are the most popular. These automatic group heads allow the water doses to be pre-set providing a more constant product.

 

Each group head can produce one or two espresso coffees at a time.  Water boiler capacities vary and must be taken into consideration when selecting the right espresso machine. If high volumes of coffee or hot water are required high volume espresso machines with high capacity water boilers are necessary. It is also important to have the right power supply for the model selected.

 

Most high volume espresso machines need minimum 20 amp power supply. This allows the water boilers to recover quickly after water of steam has been drawn off. The most common espresso machines are two group machines. Usually they have two team wands allowing more than one operator to use the machine at any one time. A 10 litre boiler and a 20 amp power supply should be ample for most small to medium requirements.Three and four group espresso machines have larger water boilers and may need 30 amp or 3 phase power supplies.

 

The demand for espresso machines with high level group heads has increased due the growth of the takeaway coffee market. The requirement for large cup volumes and high volume demand has seen a growth for the more powerful espresso machines. Some of the most popular espresso machines manufactures include Wega, Gaggia, Brasilia, and Iberital. 

 

Wega espresso machines are now one of Italy’s largest machine manufacturers and produce high quality and innovative systems. Gaggia and Brasila espresso machines are also produced in Italy and have been popular for many years. Iberital espresso machines are produced in Spain. The high level group head models with high volume boilers are very popular in the takeaway market.

 

Smaller volume domestic espresso machines vary. It is very important to select the correct machine for your situation. Some smaller units do not have pressure boilers and struggle to produce both espresso coffee and steamed milk at the same time. Large espresso machines with pressure boilers are recommended particularly if more than one cup of coffee is required.