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Home arrow Top Blog Articles arrow Coffee Articles arrow Why The Best Time To Drink Coffee Is Not First Thing In The Morning
Why The Best Time To Drink Coffee Is Not First Thing In The Morning PDF Print E-mail
Written by c0ff33   
Jan 20, 2014 at 03:16 PM

Drinking a cup of coffee first thing in the morning blunts the energy-boosting effects of caffeine and may lead to increased tolerance of the stimulant. This counterintuitive fact is explained in engaging visual form by Ryoko Iwata, ”a Japanese coffee-lover living in Seattle” on her appropriately titled blog, I Love Coffee. Iwata based her post on research gathered by Steven Miller, a Ph.D. candidate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda.

Everybody is different, of course, but we are all guided by the 24-hour hormonal cycle referred to as the circadian clock. These basic rhythms are preprogrammed into us genetically and although we can mess with our cycles through lifestyle habits, the major factor in their regulation is sunlight. One of the things that this clock controls in humans is the release of the a hormone called cortisol which makes us feel alert and awake.

Here’s the thing. The peak production of cortisol occurs between 8–9 am (under normal circumstances.) This means that at the time that many people are having their first cup of coffee on the way to work, their bodies are actually “naturally caffeinating” the most effectively! According to Iwata, the effects of caffeine consumption at times of peak cortisol levels actually diminishes the effectiveness of the additional stimulation. Worse still, “By consuming caffeine when it is not needed, your body will build a faster tolerance to it, and the buzz you get will greatly diminish.”

Cortisol is also considered a stress-related hormone and consumption of caffeine has been shown to increase the production of cortisol when timed at periods of peak cortisol levels. An increased tolerance for caffeine can therefore lead to heightened cortisol levels which can disturb circadian rhythms and have other deleterious effects on your health.

Iwata, as her blog title suggests, loves coffee and has articulated what she considers to be the optimal timing of your coffee intake to experience maximum enjoyment with minimal negative effects. The times of peak cortisol levels in most people are between 8-9 am, 12-1 pm and 5:30-6:30 pm. Therefore, timing your “coffee breaks” (an apt term) between 9:30-11:30 and 1:30 and 5:00 takes advantage of the dips in your cortisol levels when you need a boost the most.


The best times to drink coffee are when your cortisol levels naturally dip. These are, in fact, traditional “coffee break” times.

Put this way, the traditional idea of a “coffee break” makes a lot of sense. I almost wonder if the the idea of having coffee first thing is a habit instilled by the coffee industry to get us to all drink more coffee! What Iwata’s chart does not take into account is coffee consumption by early risers before 8 am, when many of us have our first cups. This raises the question of whether to have three coffees a day (probably too much for most people) or to forgo one of the periods Miller’s research suggests. I will follow up with him and report back on his response.

Iwata’s delightful blog has other pleasures as well. There is a post about an app that simulates the audio ambience of a café for those who find it a productive work environment, a comparison of the beneficial attributes of beer vs. coffee (she likes both!) and a spot on assessment of what your coffee preference reveals about your personality. For now, my cortisol is kicking in but I’ll wait for later to have a second cup.

 

You can read the full story from the Source

Espresso machines have become more and more popular over the last decade. The first commercial espresso machines were built by Achille Gaggia in 1938. They work on the principle of hot water being forced over coffee under pressure to produce espresso coffee.The size and complexity of machines vary and consideration must be given before choosing the right system.

 

Smaller espresso machines have a single group head and low capacity boilers. Some of these single group machines have hand fill water tanks however most commercial espresso systems need a mains water supply. Single group espresso machines have a single steam wand for steaming and foaming milk and can produce either one or two cups of espresso coffee at any one time.

 

Commercial espresso machines have one, two, three or four group heads, one or two steam wands, hot water facilities and a cup warming areas. Choices of semi or fully automatic group heads are usually available however automatic group heads are the most popular. These automatic group heads allow the water doses to be pre-set providing a more constant product.

 

Each group head can produce one or two espresso coffees at a time.  Water boiler capacities vary and must be taken into consideration when selecting the right espresso machine. If high volumes of coffee or hot water are required high volume espresso machines with high capacity water boilers are necessary. It is also important to have the right power supply for the model selected.

 

Most high volume espresso machines need minimum 20 amp power supply. This allows the water boilers to recover quickly after water of steam has been drawn off. The most common espresso machines are two group machines. Usually they have two team wands allowing more than one operator to use the machine at any one time. A 10 litre boiler and a 20 amp power supply should be ample for most small to medium requirements.Three and four group espresso machines have larger water boilers and may need 30 amp or 3 phase power supplies.

 

The demand for espresso machines with high level group heads has increased due the growth of the takeaway coffee market. The requirement for large cup volumes and high volume demand has seen a growth for the more powerful espresso machines. Some of the most popular espresso machines manufactures include Wega, Gaggia, Brasilia, and Iberital. 

 

Wega espresso machines are now one of Italy’s largest machine manufacturers and produce high quality and innovative systems. Gaggia and Brasila espresso machines are also produced in Italy and have been popular for many years. Iberital espresso machines are produced in Spain. The high level group head models with high volume boilers are very popular in the takeaway market.

 

Smaller volume domestic espresso machines vary. It is very important to select the correct machine for your situation. Some smaller units do not have pressure boilers and struggle to produce both espresso coffee and steamed milk at the same time. Large espresso machines with pressure boilers are recommended particularly if more than one cup of coffee is required.