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Home arrow Top Blog Articles arrow Coffee Articles arrow Why The Best Time To Drink Coffee Is Not First Thing In The Morning
Why The Best Time To Drink Coffee Is Not First Thing In The Morning PDF Print E-mail
Written by c0ff33   
Jan 20, 2014 at 03:16 PM

Drinking a cup of coffee first thing in the morning blunts the energy-boosting effects of caffeine and may lead to increased tolerance of the stimulant. This counterintuitive fact is explained in engaging visual form by Ryoko Iwata, ”a Japanese coffee-lover living in Seattle” on her appropriately titled blog, I Love Coffee. Iwata based her post on research gathered by Steven Miller, a Ph.D. candidate at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda.

Everybody is different, of course, but we are all guided by the 24-hour hormonal cycle referred to as the circadian clock. These basic rhythms are preprogrammed into us genetically and although we can mess with our cycles through lifestyle habits, the major factor in their regulation is sunlight. One of the things that this clock controls in humans is the release of the a hormone called cortisol which makes us feel alert and awake.

Here’s the thing. The peak production of cortisol occurs between 8–9 am (under normal circumstances.) This means that at the time that many people are having their first cup of coffee on the way to work, their bodies are actually “naturally caffeinating” the most effectively! According to Iwata, the effects of caffeine consumption at times of peak cortisol levels actually diminishes the effectiveness of the additional stimulation. Worse still, “By consuming caffeine when it is not needed, your body will build a faster tolerance to it, and the buzz you get will greatly diminish.”

Cortisol is also considered a stress-related hormone and consumption of caffeine has been shown to increase the production of cortisol when timed at periods of peak cortisol levels. An increased tolerance for caffeine can therefore lead to heightened cortisol levels which can disturb circadian rhythms and have other deleterious effects on your health.

Iwata, as her blog title suggests, loves coffee and has articulated what she considers to be the optimal timing of your coffee intake to experience maximum enjoyment with minimal negative effects. The times of peak cortisol levels in most people are between 8-9 am, 12-1 pm and 5:30-6:30 pm. Therefore, timing your “coffee breaks” (an apt term) between 9:30-11:30 and 1:30 and 5:00 takes advantage of the dips in your cortisol levels when you need a boost the most.


The best times to drink coffee are when your cortisol levels naturally dip. These are, in fact, traditional “coffee break” times.

Put this way, the traditional idea of a “coffee break” makes a lot of sense. I almost wonder if the the idea of having coffee first thing is a habit instilled by the coffee industry to get us to all drink more coffee! What Iwata’s chart does not take into account is coffee consumption by early risers before 8 am, when many of us have our first cups. This raises the question of whether to have three coffees a day (probably too much for most people) or to forgo one of the periods Miller’s research suggests. I will follow up with him and report back on his response.

Iwata’s delightful blog has other pleasures as well. There is a post about an app that simulates the audio ambience of a café for those who find it a productive work environment, a comparison of the beneficial attributes of beer vs. coffee (she likes both!) and a spot on assessment of what your coffee preference reveals about your personality. For now, my cortisol is kicking in but I’ll wait for later to have a second cup.

 

You can read the full story from the Source

If you enjoy the taste of fresh ground, home made coffee there is certain equipment that you will need to make this well. One of the key parts of the home coffee makers equipment is the espresso grinder and this is basically used to reduce coffee beans to the grounds that are used in an espresso machine.

There are a couple of advantages to owning an espresso coffee grinder. Firstly it can be more cost effective than buying pre-packed grounds and although you have the initial outlay of buying the espresso coffee nmachine this should be paid back in time with the cost saving from grinding your own beans. The second advantage is freshness. Generally it is agreed that the sooner after grinding espresso beans that you brew the coffee, the better the coffee will taste. Pre-packed coffee beans can sit on the shelf for a long time before use and therefore the best way to ensure the freshness and quality of the grounds you use is to make your own with an espresso coffee grinder.

If you are considering purchasing an espresso grinder there are a couple of types available on the market. These comprise grinders with a blade and those with a burr. The blade espresso grinder typically has a fan shaped blade that chops up the beans and these tend to be the less expensive type. However the blade type can produce grounds of inconsistent sized grains. If you are looking for more consistent grounds, which is typically said to make better tasting coffee, the espresso burr coffee grinder can be a better choice and this crushes the beans between a stationary surface and a grinding wheel.

Prices for coffee grinders which are suitable for home use can vary between £40 at the more affordable end of the market up to around £600 for the more professional style of grinder. For commercial espresso grinders the price can go up as high as £1000 to £2000 for top grade equipment.

Some of the companies that manufacture coffee grinders include Cimbali, Capresso and Rancilio. Examples of the espresso grinders on the market include The Iberital MC2 At around £130 to purchase this is considered to be one of the best budget grinders available. It has conical steel burrs which provide high precision grinding and has 16 settings allowing extra fine to coarse grinding. It also has a timer which can be set between 5 and 60 seconds and this allows you to work to an accurate grinding time. The Rancilio Rocky Burr Grinder with Doser is considered to be another good grinder and this retails for around £245. This is a medium duty grinder which is good for the home or small business. The grinding wheels are made of high quality hardened, tempered steel which provides a consistent grind and pulling the dosing handle will dispense around 7 grams of ground coffee each time.

To make the best possible home made coffee an espresso grinder can be an essential piece of equipment. It ensures you have the freshest grounds possible to make your daily espresso and this will help you make a great tasting cup of coffee every time.