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Coffee has secret trick to stop sleep
Written by c0ff33   
Jan 26, 2016 at 09:15 AM

 

A cup of coffee in the evening may be keeping you awake for more reasons than you realise, scientists say.

Their study, in Science Translation Medicine, showed caffeine was more than just a stimulant and actually slowed down the body's internal clock.

A double espresso three hours before bedtime delayed the production of the sleep hormone melatonin by about 40 minutes, making it harder to nod off.

Experts said our own actions had a huge influence on sleep and the body clock.

One of the researchers, Dr John O'Neill, from the Medical Research Council's Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, told the BBC News website: "If you're tired and having a coffee at night to stay awake, then that is a bad idea, you'll find it harder to go to sleep and get enough sleep."

In his half of the study, cells grown in a dish were exposed to caffeine to work out how it changed their ability to keep time.

It showed the drug was able to alter the chemical clocks ticking away in every cell of the human body.

Wakey wakey

Meanwhile, five people at the University of Colorado Boulder, in the US, were locked in a sleep laboratory for 50 days.

And as light exposure is the main way we normally control our body clock, they spent most of their incarceration in very dim light.

In a series of experiments over the month and a half, the scientists showed that an evening dose of caffeine slowed the body clock by 40 minutes.

It had roughly half the impact of three hours of bright light at bedtime.
Dr O'Neill said it would be "complete speculation" to set a cut-off time for drinking caffeine in the evening but he personally never drank coffee after 17:00.

He said the findings may help treat some sleep disorders and people who naturally woke up too early - known as larks - to help keep them in sync with the rest of the world.

"It could be useful with jet lag if you are flying east to west where taking caffeine at the right time of day might speed up the time it takes to overcome jet lag," he added.

Prof Derk-Jan Dijk, from the University of Surrey, told the BBC: "Individuals differ in their sensitivity to caffeine, and if coffee drinkers experience problems with falling asleep, they may try to avoid drinking coffee in the afternoon and evening."

He added that people "too often" thought they were a "slave" to their body clocks and programmed to wake up early or late.

"These and other data clearly indicate that we can to some extent modify these rhythms and that part of the reason why we sleep so late relates to factors such as caffeine intake and the exposure to artificial light in the evening," he said.

Read the full story from the source

Coffee not associated with lifestyle diseases
Written by c0ff33   
Jul 10, 2015 at 04:29 PM

Danish researchers are the first in the world to have used our genes to investigate the impact of coffee on the body. The new study shows that coffee neither increases nor decreases the risk of lifestyle diseases.

We love coffee -- and we drink a lot of it. New research from the University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital shows that coffee neither increases nor decreases the risk of developing lifestyle diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The researchers have based their study on genes, as our genes play a role in how much coffee we drink in the course of a day. The study has just been published in the International Journal of Epidemiology and is based on DNA and information about coffee drinking and lifestyle diseases from 93,000 Danes from the Copenhagen General Population Study.

"We are the first in the world to have investigated the relationship with genes associated with a lifelong high consumption of coffee. These genes are completely independent of other lifestyle factors, and we can therefore conclude that drinking coffee in itself is not associated with lifestyle diseases," says medical student Ask Tybjaeg Nordestgaard from the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital.

Genes determine our thirst for coffee

The researchers have designed a unique study, where they have looked into a number of genes that affect our desire for coffee. If you have the special coffee genes, you may be drinking more coffee than those not having the genes. This allows the researchers to see whether a higher coffee consumption increases or decreases the risk of developing lifestyle diseases.

"We can now see that the coffee genes are surprisingly not associated with a risk of developing type 2 diabetes or obesity. This suggests that drinking coffee neither causes nor protects against these lifestyle diseases," says Boerge Nordestgaard, clinical professor at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital.

Read the full story here

Purchase a range of Roasted Coffee Beans online from Pennine Tea and Coffee

What are the health benefits of coffee?
Written by c0ff33   
Jul 01, 2015 at 09:30 AM

A cup of coffee in the morning may pack more than just an energy boost.

More and more research is emerging to suggest that there may be several health benefits associated with drinking this dark black beverage, from helping prevent diabetes to lowering the risk of liver disease.

The consumption of coffee goes back centuries.

In 17th century England the popularity of the drink gave rise to a number of coffee houses which were dubbed 'penny universities', because with one penny a person could buy a cup of coffee and have intellectually stimulating conversations with other people.1

Nowadays, with over 400 billion cups consumed every year, coffee is one of the world's most popular drinks. But what makes it special?

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods.

Nutritional breakdown of coffee
Calorie count

Regular black coffee (without milk or cream) has a very low calorie count. A typical cup of black coffee only contains around 2 calories.

However, if you add sugar and milk, the calorie count can shoot up.

A splash of coffee
Antioxidants

Coffee is the number one source of antioxidants in the U.S., according to researchers at the University of Scranton.

Joe Vinson, Ph.D., lead author of the study, said that "Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than any other dietary source. Nothing else comes close."2

The authors of the study emphasize moderation, stating that only one or two cups a day appear to be beneficial.

Caffeinated and decaffeinated versions provided nearly the same levels of antioxidants.

Health benefits of coffee
The potential health benefits associated with drinking coffee include: protecting against type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, liver disease, liver cancer, and promoting a healthy heart.3

Coffee may protect against type 2 diabetes

Coffee may be protective against type 2 diabetes. Researchers at UCLA identified that drinking coffee increases plasma levels of the protein sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG controls the biological activity of the body's sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) which play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.4

Dr. Simin Liu, one of the authors of the study, said that an "inverse association" exists between coffee consumption and risk for type 2 diabetes.

Increased coffee consumption may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes - the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers gathered data from three studies. In these studies, the diets of the participants were evaluated using questionnaires every 4 years, with participants who reported having type 2 diabetes filling out additional questionnaires. In total, 7,269 study participants had type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that the participants who increased their coffee intake by more than one cup a day (on average, an increase of 1.69 cups per day) over a 4-year period had an 11% lower type 2 diabetes risk over the subsequent 4 years, compared with people who did not change their intake.

Coffee may help prevent Parkinson's disease

Researchers in the U.S. carried out a study that assessed the link between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease risk. The authors of the study concluded that "higher coffee and caffeine intake is associated with a significantly lower incidence of Parkinson's disease".5

In addition, caffeine in coffee may help control movement in people suffering from Parkinson's, according to a study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) that was published in the journal Neurology.6

Coffee may lower the risk of liver cancer

Italian researchers found that coffee consumption lowers the risk of liver cancer by about 40%. In addition, some of the results suggest that if you drink three cups a day, the risks are reduced by more than 50%.7

The lead author of the study, Dr. Carlo La Vecchia, from Milan's Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, said "our research confirms past claims that coffee is good for your health and particularly the liver."

Coffee may help prevent liver disease

Regular consumption of coffee is linked to a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare autoimmune disease of the bile ducts in the liver.8

In addition, coffee consumption can lower the incidence of cirrhosis of the liver for alcohol drinkers by 22%, according to a study at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, California, USA.

The authors of the study concluded that the results "support the hypothesis that there is an ingredient in coffee that protects against cirrhosis, especially alcoholic cirrhosis."9

Research published in the journal Hepatology in April 2014, suggests that drinking coffee is linked to a decreased liver cirrhosis death risk. The researchers suggest that drinking two or more cups of coffee every day can reduce the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%.16

A study published in the journal Hepatology indicates that drinking decaf coffee also lowers liver enzyme levels, suggesting the benefits are not linked to caffeine content.

Coffee may be good for the heart

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard School of Public Health, concluded that drinking coffee in moderation protects against heart failure. They defined 'in moderation' as 2 European cups (equivalent to two 8-ounce American servings) per day.10

People who drank four European cups on a daily basis had an 11% lower risk of heart failure, compared to those who did not.

The authors stressed that their results "did show a possible benefit, but like with so many other things we consume, it really depends on how much coffee you drink."

Recent developments on the benefits of coffee from MNT news
Tinnitus less common in women who drink more coffee. A new study in The American Journal of Medicine finds that women who consume more caffeine are less likely to have tinnitus.
Study links coffee intake with reduced risk of endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common cancer of the female reproductive organs in the US, affecting around 1 in 37 women in their lifetime. But in a new study, researchers found that drinking three to four cups of coffee a day could reduce the risk of endometrial cancer by almost a fifth.
Drinking up to five cups of coffee a day may benefit the arteries. A new study has suggested drinking three to five cups of coffee a day reduces the risk of clogged arteries and heart attacks.
Coffee linked to reduced risk of erectile dysfunction. Drinking two to three cups of coffee every day could lower a man's risk of erectile dysfunction. This is according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE.
Risks
Drinking too much coffee can result in some very unpleasant adverse effects. According to a study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma, "caffeine can cause anxiety symptoms in normal individuals, especially in vulnerable patients, like those with pre-existing anxiety disorders."13

In addition, "caffeine use is also associated with symptoms of depression due to either a self-medication theory, or a theory that caffeine itself causes changes in mood."

Women who plan on becoming pregnant should be cautious. Researchers from the University of Nevada School of Medicine reported in the British Journal of Pharmacology that regular coffee may reduce a woman's chances of becoming pregnant.14
Medical News Today examined the positive and negative effects of drinking coffee in an article in July 2012, Drinking Coffee: More Good Than Harm?.

Read the full article here

Purchase your Filter Coffee Machines from Pennine Tea and Coffee

<< Start < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next > End >>

Kenco Westminster medium roast filter coffee is a carefully selected blend of coffee beans from Central and Southern America. The Kenco Westminster coffee beans are slowly toasted until they reach a medium roast, and then they are ground to filter coffee grade. Kenco Westminster coffee is a smooth, fruity, slightly sweet and well rounded filter coffee.

Kenco Westminster coffee is a smooth and fruity coffee in 60g sachets for optimum freshness.Kenco Westminster coffee is named after the City of Westminster in London.


Why use Kenco?

Kenco's coffee comes from Rainforest Alliance Certified™ farms, where forests are protected and rivers, soils and wildlife conserved. Kenco choose the best beans and the best eco-friendly packaging, it's the thought - that makes the difference - that counts.

Great coffee is made with great care. It's the care Kenco takes - at every stage of production - that makes the coffee you love.

Kenco makes coffee while the sun shines. During the dry season Kenco hand picks their coffee 'cherries' when they're at their ripest!

How do you guarantee the best quality?

Kenco dries the superiour beans from the coffee cherries under the tropical afternoon sun, and they do it evenly so they're perfectly dried all 'round. That means turning them every half hour or so.
Only the best quality beans are selected for roasting - at just the right temperature to create just the right flavour.


Sustainability

Your cup of Kenco coffee tastes even better when you know that it's grown using sustainable farming methods.

Kenco's friendship with the Rainforest Alliance ensures a better living for the people and their families who grow your coffee. It also helps protect the environment and the wildlife that depend on it. Proof, as if it were needed, that good taste and good work can go together!


Kenco buys all the beans for their freeze dried range from Rainforest Alliance CertifiedTM farms. That's 100% commitment to providing the coffee growing community with better wages, education, healthcare and environment protection - a better move forward all around.

Our History...

The early days - 1920s - 1945
In the 1920s a group of retired coffee planters set up a highly fashionable chain of coffee shops under the banner of The Kenya Coffee Company.
In 1921, LC Gibbs and CS Baines began selling coffee from a shop in Vere Street, Mayfair. The shop sold roast and ground coffee locally but most of its sales were by mail order - selling coffee to country houses using advertisements in publications like Tatler, Country Life and The Times.
As demand increased, the company moved to number 30 Sloane Street, an equally fashionable address and bought premises in Long Lane, Bermondsey.
Subsequently, premises at London's Earlsfield were acquired to cope with increased roasting and packing.
The Bermondsey premises were next door to a food merchants called John Gardiner (later Gardiner Merchant). Gardiner ran a food wholesaling business, restaurants - including the uber-chic Scott's seafood restaurant - and provided outdoor catering at events such as Wimbledon. They purchased their coffee from The Kenya Coffee Company.

After the war
After the Second World War, a Gardiner employee, Tom Kelly, persuaded the company to buy The Kenya Coffee Company. On completion of the deal, Tom Kelly was put in charge of the new business and he expanded the retail chain.
As well as selling coffee by mail order and from the Sloane Street premises, Kelly diversified into catering and opened coffee shops in the King's Road in Chelsea, Kingston, Wimbledon, Golders Green, Old Compton Street, Knightsbridge, Ealing and outside London in Cambridge, Glasgow, Leicester and Norwich.
The Kenya Coffee Company shops may well have been the first branded high street coffee shop chain in the UK!

Expansion in the swinging sixties
By the 1960s, The Kenya Coffee Company cafes were thriving - selling not only coffee but also cakes. The cakes were made in London and then shipped by road and rail to the various branches each night.
Tom Kelly also spotted the wider opportunity for espresso coffee - after acquiring the rights to sell Gaggia machines, the company began to supply these to other coffee bars.
During the 60s, the amount of beans that The Kenya Coffee Company bought from Kenya began to decrease substantially and the company name was changed to The Kenco Coffee Company to reflect this. In 1962, Kenco branded coffee was first served! The success of the company was noticed by larger corporations and it was taken over by the hotel group, Truste House, while roasting continued at the Earlsfield site.
Kenco coffee continued to be served through all the coffee shops and whole beans and ground coffees were sold in 2oz jars alongside jam and other speciality goods. To meet increasing demand Kenco set up a national sales force to sell Kenco coffee to other coffee shop businesses.

The seventies
In 1972, Truste House (now Truste House Forte) sold the Kenco brand to Cadbury.
Under Cadbury ownership,The Kenco Coffee Company sales team was supported by a nimble fleet of delivery vans and continued to grow significantly - so much so that in the mid 1970s the desirable Kenco brand was acquired by Premier Foods.
The eighties and nineties
In 1987 General Foods purchased The Kenco Coffee Company and it was in these decades that the foundations of today's Kenco Coffee Company were laid - although as you can see, the brand looks a little bit different today!

The future
The Kenco Coffee Company history is rich and varied. We like to think that we've always been a company that has anticipated trends and adapted accordingly sometimes with radical results. As British consumers become increasingly sophisticated about their coffee choices when they're away from home, we continue to strive for innovation and to anticipate consumer requirements - whether that's a dark roasted Italian espresso or an ethically sourced coffee.

Flowers Love Coffee Too

Your old filter papers and old coffee can be composted. Old coffee grounds can be used in your garden, and here are a few useful facts on how to go about using old coffee grounds for plants and flowers.
Coffee grounds lose most of their acidity during the coffee brewing process, leaving the coffee grounds with an average pH of 6.9 and a carbon-nitrogen ratio of 20-1.

Primary Nutrients:

Nitrogen 1.45%, Phosphorus ND ug/g, Potassium 1204 ug/g.

Secondary Nutrients:

Calcium 389 up/g, Magnesium 448 ug/g, Sulphur high ug/g.

Old coffee grounds can be mixed with general soil around acid loving plants, which include azaleas, hydrangeas, rhododendrons and camellias. You can add brown leaves and grass cuttings to the coffee grounds, to make mulch which will help to balance the pH of your soil. By mixing your old coffee grounds into the compost you will help to accelerate the composting process.

Please note there are two main types of ingredients to add to your compost.

1. Brown materials such as old coffee filter papers, tea bags, dead leaves, old papers and wood sawdust, these are all high in carbon.
2. Green materials such as old coffee grounds, tea, food waste and even manure, these are all high in nitrogen.

A simple rule is, to mix half and half of the above brown and green materials to make the perfect compost! You can even help a worm bin to flourish by feeding the worms with old coffee grounds mixed with some brown material.

As a small word of caution, please remember when using old coffee grounds for composting, you should never use more than 25% of coffee grounds in any one compost pile!

 

Espresso Coffee Revealed

Espresso coffee was actually invented in France, before being perfected in Italy, and is today enjoyed around the world, making espresso coffee a truly universal beverage.
Espresso coffee is a particular style of coffee drink and not a specific type of coffee bean.
Espresso coffee is made from very finely ground coffee beans, which is tightly packed, and through which hot water is forced at pressure, to extract maximum flavour. The result is a rich, dark and extremely flavourful concentrated black coffee. On average, a single espresso coffee is usually a 7g dose of finely ground coffee, which should take 20 seconds to make a 30ml shot of espresso. The perfect espresso should then result in a fabulous shot of dark coffee which is topped off by a beautiful, 3-4 mm head of thick golden foam known as "Crema ", which is a product of the coffee's natural oils and the source of its rich flavour and aroma. The ideal espresso should be served in cups that are dry and warm, possibly narrow in order to concentrate the espresso's aromas and crema.

The Coffee Grind is Critical.

The ideal grind will result in a slow, steady flow of espresso coffee. As with most coffee, the best time to grind your coffee beans is immediately before brewing. If the grind is too coarse, the coffee will gush out and the espresso will be weak and under extracted. Too fine a grind and the espresso will drip out, one bitter drip at a time. The correct dose nearly fills your filter insert / basket with the freshly ground fine coffee, with a consistency between flour and sugar, and leaving a small gap for the grounds of coffee to expand as they become saturated.
For lower pressure units, an extra fine grind with some granularity will work, you can even use an inexpensive coffee bean grinder to achieve this texture. High pressure commercial coffee machines require a finer, more powdery grind , which can be obtained from a commercial grinder .

The Portion of Ground Coffee Required.

A single shot of espresso coffee requires roughly 1-1.5 table spoons or 7 grams of ground coffee. Be aware to not overfill your filter insert, always leaving a small gap to let the coffee expand.

Tamping.

Tamping is the gentle packing down of the finely ground coffee into the coffee filter prior to brewing. This ensures that the water will flow evenly through the coffee grounds, producing a complete extraction of all the coffee flavour.

The Extraction.

A shot of espresso should ideally take 20 seconds for a 30ml of liquid coffee, and should flow as freely as honey from a spoon. Should your extraction times be any shorter or longer, you may wish to check your coffee grind .A double shot of ground coffee should result in a double espresso of 60 ml. The pump pressure of the traditional cappuccino espresso machine should be at 9 atmospheres, and the water temperature between 84 and 93 C.

The Truth and Misconceptions about Espresso.

The first misconception about espresso coffee is that it should be bitter and burnt tasting. Actually, a perfect espresso shot should be aromatic, bitter sweet and assertive, with a lingering aftertaste.
The second myth is that drinking an espresso will keep you awake all night. However, despite an espresso having a strong flavour, it actually contains less caffeine than a regular coffee. Typically 60-80 mg of caffeine per shot of espresso as compared to 80-100mg per cup of regular coffee due to espresso's shorter extraction time.
Finally, most people think it takes a lot of time and effort to prepare a shot of espresso, but as the name implies, it is easy and very quick to make a perfect espresso coffee

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